«
»

WAR CIRCUS: NICOLAI POLIAKOFF/COCO THE CLOWN (English/Italian)

At the outbreak of war Nicolai was fourteen, and already a seasoned circus performer and clown who had run away to start his career at a very very young age. He is better known as ‘Coco the Clown’. The Narative here is extracted from his Autobiography: Coco the Clown by himself. J.M. Dent & Sons. 1941

Nicolai can also be heard talking about his war experiences on the BBC Radio 4 programme Desert Island Discs in 1963

 

1914

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

CHILD ARTISTE NEWS.

   My friend Gingek has changed. Here I am, happily working with little thought for anything but the glorious possibilities the circus holds for me after all I have suffered, and in he walks with swagger and in uniform – a smirk of satisfaction all over his face: ‘Be off with you,’ he said. ‘Soldiers do not talk to children. Run, before I beat you with this bayonet.’ Some friend.

   It turns out a war has started between Germany and Russia! All thoughts of my future as a famous clown have left my head – I must become a soldier, I am no child! There is one problem though. Although my age isn’t necessarily a concern in the eyes of the army, I am very small. This won’t deter me though – I am a gifted circus artiste! I can somersault, I am agile, I am strong, I can ride a horse – they would be fools to turn down someone with my unusual skill set.

   Such frustration! Here I am willing to lay down my life, renounce my dreams of circus glory, and my repeated attempts to join the Russian regiment are only met with laughter!

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

c. SEPT 1915

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

CHILD SIBERIAN SOLDIER NEWS.

   Finally, now aged 15, I have been accepted – this feeling almost equals the joy I received on my first appearance as a paid artiste! The 11th Siberian Infantry – a regiment made up of half Russians and half Tartar – and all very short in height. I fit in perfectly. Although small in frame the men’s hearts are big, and equally so is their appetite for fighting. Due to my horse riding experience I have been made an outrider and have been given a long cavalry coat! And spurs! And a sabre that clanks against my legs. I feel like a general.

   I have just seen Gingek again and how I enjoyed that moment! His mouth dropped open, and he nearly sprang to attention when he saw my sword and spurs. ‘Be off with you,’ I said. ‘I am an outrider. We do not talk with foot-sloggers!’

   War is even more exciting than the circus! I have already accomplished my first military triumph. We are near Oli and were reconnoitering in advance of our battalion when I noticed a very odd looking haystack. I yelled ‘Halt!’, causing a terrible commotion among the troops and much cursing from the officers. But upon inspection of this suspicious hay bail we discovered a machine gun with boxes of ammunition – the enemy have been preparing for a sudden advance! I beamed with pride as the old general pinned a cross of the Fourth Class to my tunic and promoted me to rank of lance-corporal. I am so proud and happy! War is glorious and full of adventure!

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

c. DEC 1915

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

CHILD SIBERIAN SOLDIER NEWS.

War is clouded with tears of grief and horror. I am crouching at the bottom of a trench and crying heavily. All around me the very earth is dissolving in smoke and fire. This is the true face of war – the game has changed.

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

c. DEC 1916

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

CHILD SIBERIAN SOLDIER NEWS.

I’m lying in a hospital bed in Riga after being wounded in a bombing raid. Once able to I will be sent back to the front again. Fear consumes me.

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

c. FEB 1917

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

CHILD SOLDIER GOING HOME. 

Food has become very scarce and quality meals are rationed to those desperately ill. The chief medical officer just came into the ward and made an appeal for any patient strong enough to walk to leave and fend for himself. Although I still feel very weak, I have said I will go. They have given me clothes that would make a circus audience roar with laughter – a soldier’s coat, an athlete’s belt, and civilian trousers – the hat I cannot describe! And now, in these grotesque clothes, I will walk the snowy streets of Petrograd.  

   This is a Petrograd I do not know. The city is starving. Everywhere workers are on strike, even with threats of 25 years banishment to Siberia or the firing squad. Children wail, families huddle into the angles of the walls trying to keep off the deadly cold. People are literally starving to death. Everywhere armed policemen move the miserable people on. I cry for them, and Russia – tears of weakness and sorrow.

    As conditions get worse, revolution becomes more attractive. I have just tried to cross the River Neva but have been refused by a policemen, saying that no one can cross the bridge tonight. What should I do! I wish I could return to the hospital, even without any food. A motor lorry pulled up packed with students, soldiers, sailors on leave, and a few women. A long-haired student stepped out and stood up on a box, addressing the crowd in a passionate language: “My comrades!’ he cried. ‘The war is being lost. At home they are starving you to death There is no hope for you! Are you going to stand by and see your husbands starved to death, your wives dying from the cold, your children trampled underfoot?’ He whipped off a red cloth attached to the side of the lorry revealing bayonets, swords, revolvers, and ammunition. The crowd went mad! What cries and cheers came from those poor weak throats! As I write this I’m admiring the bayonet someone thrust in my hands and the sight of it in my athlete’s belt makes me grin.

   Pandemonium has broken loose in Petrograd! A tired old man, carrying a dinner-basin tied up in a red handkerchief, tried to push his way through the crowd to cross the River Neva bridge. A Cossack stopped him. In a thin, piteous voice, the old man explained that if he could reach the other side of the river his daughter might let him have a little food. Looking sadly at him, the Cossack refused and turned away. The old man trailed wearily after him, repeating an old Russian proverb that says that a man who is not hungry can never believe a man who is hungry. This annoyed the Cossack officer who ordered a soldier to take the old man away. But the soldier did not move. With an angry oath, the officer rode up to the old man and slashed him furiously across the face with his riding-whip. The old fellow dropped his empty basin and began to cry. Without a word, the Cossack drew his sabre and killed the officer. The Cossacks killed all their officers. The crowd went mad and tried to rush the bridge. But from every housetop along the quays came a rain of bullets, fired by policemen hidden with machine-guns, killing many. The bodies were tossed in the river. A howling, impassioned mob streamed across the bridge and stormed the public buildings. The revolution has begun. This is not the kind of circus for me. I must get to Riga at all costs!

   I have cut my leg on my own bayonet. I stare at a red rosette made from the clothes of dead men. I was trying to push through the crowd in the Zabolkanski Prospekt when there was a fresh burst from the machine-guns on the roofs. Men and women were shot down all around me and that’s when I fell and my bayonet clashed with my leg. Dazed and frightened, I picked myself up. Just as I was passing a big building, someone cried: ‘Look out, there!’ I rushed to one side just as a huge cabinet came crashing though a top-floor window. It smashed to splinters on the pavement, and out rolled three high police officials – dead. A soldier on horseback – how funny he looked – rode up and emptied his revolver into them – just to make sure. The crowd, screaming and shouting, tore the red-lined coats off the dead men. They made the linings into any red rosettes. An excited laughing girl pressed one into my hand. I stuck it into my coat. But I didn’t want it. I pressed on to the station. A circus clown in a revolution! There is something comic in the idea. But right now I don’t feel very comic.

   Even just getting onto the train was a challenge. Amongst the crowd at the station, in my queer costume, my bayonet in my belt, and a red rosette in my buttonhole, I thought I looked enough of a revolutionary to get a pass for Riga. Hours later, it seemed, a train came in. Thousands of men, women, and children stampeded over the platforms. Women fainted. Children were trampled underfoot. I heard terrible cries and groans. Humanity and decency were forgotten in this wild exodus from a city gone mad. It was quite impossible to get into a compartment, so I climbed to the top of the coach, it was crusted deep in snow. But so thickly wedged were the passengers in the coach underneath me that the heat of their bodies rose like plumes of smoke through the ventilators. And this vapour, nauseating though it was, was the only thing keeping us alive as we travelled through the night in Russian winter.

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

c. FEB 1917

 NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

CHILD SIBERIAN SOLDIER NEWS.

Only two months after my treatment in Riga I am back in the hospital bed, this time in Petrograd for special treatment, after being wounded in the feet and face. Although traumatised by the capabilities of man revealed to me I am thankful that my sense of humour remains and am enjoying joking with other patients in the ward. We’re not allowed to smoke though and how I have been longing for a cigarette! Thankfully the man in a bed near my own quickly lit up after the orderly left the room and offered me one. There was one problem though – he had arm injuries so could not throw and I could not walk for my feet so on first look just getting the cigarette was problematic. But my circus mind came alive! I half fell out of bed and walked to him on my hands, my bandaged feet waving in the air! It is not all fun and games though on the ward. I lie awake every night knowing the Germans come nearer and nearer to my beautiful Russia every day, as if they can make no mistake. Insomnia consumes me as I hear the relentless tramp, tramp of their marching feet and I toss and turn in horror. Nicolai the boy has slowly died – I am now Nicolai the man. Deep inside Coco the clown lives on.

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

c. NOV 1917 

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

CHILD RUSSIAN SOLDIER NEWS.

   At last I have reached Riga! Nearly dead with cold and exhaustion I have made it to my home. It is so good to see mother and father, brothers and sisters. At this moment and after what I have experienced I never want to leave home again.

   My older brother has also returned from War and he is angry with the revolutionaries. He told me that I must join Kerensky’s Army with him. It is our duty. My mother is distraught, and she clung to me and wept, but I know I must join. I am not eager to see any more fighting, against anybody, but as my brother said – it is my duty.

   I have been drafted into the First Petrograd Artistes Company. We work all day and travel all night from camp to camp entertaining troops to boost morale. The soldiers are restless and anxious to be demobilised. I fear our Company will be disbanded.

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

c. NOV 1917

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

CHILD UKRANIAN SOLDIER NEWS.

My fears were made reality and I have now joined the White Ukraine Army at Kiev. I share a room with a railwayman – a secretive, dark fellow. He does laugh at my tricks though.

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

c. JAN 1918 

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

CHILD RED ARMY SOLDIER NEWS.

   This railwayman turned out to be destined as a friend in need to me. Already I have joined a different army – the Railway Red Army of Kiev! One day the Red Army stormed Kiev and drove the Whites out. in the confusion I was left behind and found myself in the hands of some of the Red soldiers. They seemed to think that I was a secret service agent. They asked me many questions about the White Army. I protested that I knew nothing. The butt of a rifle crashed into my face. They beat me with rifles until I was half dead. ‘A little reminder, eh, comrade? Better to tell and live, eh, comrade?’ I told them I knew nothing and that I am only a circus clown and have been entertaining the troops. The soldier spat on the floor: ‘Well, we have a theatre here for you.’ I was dragged to a building, and the guards pushed me in. I was in the Kiev theatre – an astonishing sight! The stalls were filled with prisoners – officers, soldiers, civilians, suspected aristocrats, wandering merchants, beggars, sick and wounded. They had all been rounded up by the Reds and put in the theatre seats, while all around stood armed sentries. A Red officer strode on stage – a paper in his hand. He read out a list of names and these prisoners were dragged from their seats and marched out. After a few minutes we heard a fusillade. That was all. Next to me sat an officer. We tried to ease the awful tension by talking. I told him of my life as a clown and of the concerts I have been giving to the troops. We looked up as the officer read another list of names, listened to the fusillade, and then continued to talk again. The officer came on stage again, this time without his paper. I hoped we were all to be released! Every ear was strained. ‘Nicolai Poliakoff,’ he shouted. So I was to go alone, I thought. The officer silently pressed my hand. I walked with the two guards to the anteroom. Sitting at the table, wearing a leather jacket, was the railwayman – my room companion at Kiev! My heart gave a great jump. ‘Tell them I am no soldier,’ I gasped. ‘I have killed no comrades. I am a clown.’ He calmed me and told me I would be set free. ‘Free to go home?’ I said. ‘Oh, thank you, thank you. I have had enough of war.’ My heart groaned inside me as he told me I was to join the Red Railway Army of Kiev, but it was that or the firing squad.

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

c. APRIL 1918

 

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

CHILD WHITE ARMY SOLDIER NEWS.

   The White Army has advanced and driven us out of Kiev. We have retreated to Ramadan, between Kiev and Poltava, and disaster follows us – this time, typhoid.

   I have woken up in a strange bed in a strange place. I received orders to go to Poltava to take charge of some supplies. During my expedition I felt more and more unwell, and I realised with horror I had the first symptoms of typhoid. I must have collapsed suddenly into blackness. A nurse here has warned me that the Whites have taken over Poltava and that I should say nothing until I am well as they are not quite sure who I am. I will do as she tells me.

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

c. JUNE 1918

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

CHILD WHITE ARMY SOLDIER NEWS.

   I have been made a German interpreter now that I’m well enough. I was marched before the German officer who was commanding this section of the White Army. I pretended I was still dazed and incoherent, so much so that I even fainted on the way to his office. We passed guards flogging a man with rifle ramrods. His screams were terrible, the guards were cursing and the blood flowing. I thought that this was the next treat in store for me, but to my surprise I’ve found that no one has any hard feelings towards me, and so when they learnt I could speak some German I was instructed to interpret for them.

   I decided today to approach the officer in charge, after being in Poltava for some time now. I felt so weary and homesick that I thought I would probably risk approaching him to ask how much longer I have to stay here. He looked surprised and asked me whether I am a prisoner. ‘I think so, Herr Kommandant. But on what charge I do not know.’ He said he would look into it, which gives me hope.

   I was sent for by Herr Kommandant again today and he told me no one seems to know anything about me! ‘If you want to go, go now.’ I saluted him. For the first time in my life I am happy that nobody cares whether I live or die, stay or depart

Moscow is melancholy and disorganised, stricken by famine. After some months of struggle I have made my way to the city to find potatoes and herrings are worth their weight in gold. Starving people risking the bullets of the guards, scrabble and dig in the pits to find decayed food. The hideous scenes of cruelty, hunger, and lust that I have seen will stay with me to my grave.

   Today I could not believe my ears! I was wandering along the streets and somebody called my name – my father’s voice! I stood in frozen amazement and then turned round cautiously. There stood my father who I had believed was safe in Riga. He has lost weight and has rags for clothes. He smiled wistfully at me. There was barely time for him to explain the strange, stormy story of what had brought him to Moscow before we realised we urgently needed to eat. We have decided to walk into the country, buy bread, and bring it back to the city to sell for profit! After a time we will be able to travel to Vitebsk.

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

c. NOV 1918

 

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

CHILD WHITE ARMY SOLDIER NEWS.

   In Vitebsk, I have met by chance an old Italian circus clown, called Bernado. His sons have deserted him and now he is alone. I’ve decided that we might keep out of trouble and away from fighting if we combine together and do the work I did in the Kerensky Army – providing concerts for troops. It took some convincing but I managed to convince Bernado to accompany me to the Red Army headquarters and they approved our plan! We will be given a small percentage of the money taken at performances we organise. We haven’t received our first orders yet and with the little money we have left I have told my father to go home to Riga. He was reluctant at first, but I persuaded him, and I gave him many messages from myself to give to mother and my brothers and sisters.

   It is enough to say that if we don’t get out of this frozen hell we should both die. Our first orders from the Red Army were to go on active service in Siberia! Conditions here are terrible. I got poor old Bernado into this situation and it worries me terribly. For every mile of our awful journey he thought of a new name for me. When he had worked them all out in Italian, he began all over again in Russian.

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

 c. DEC 1918

 BACK AT HOME.

   There is no light and laughter in my home. I am back in Riga, after being invalided home. Bernardo was also sent home, before me – another casualty. Whilst I had been in Petrograd a party of Reds had burst into our home. My elder brother was there, having a meal with my father and mother. The Reds knew him for an ex-soldier in the White Army. They dragged him out into the back garden. My poor mother screamed and entreated them in vain. They shot him down there and left him to bleed to death in the snow. I feel the senseless hatred that burnt at the core of this revolution, and I swear vengeance against all Reds.

    I’ve decided to stay at home with my father and mother for a little time. They are growing older and are sad and lonely after my elder brother’s cruel death. I’ve managed to get stage work at the cinema in town. Every night, on my way home from work, I pass a block of flats. Last night, passing these flats, something fell on to the pavement in front of me. I saw a box of matches. I picked them up and looked up at the house. Two girls and one young man were looking from a sixth-floor window, laughing at me. I called up, and asked them if the matches belonged to them. One girl came down, and I looked at her and I thought she was the loveliest girl I had ever seen. We smiled at each other. Her name was Valentina. She told me she recognised me from the stage and I told her not to keep her windows open in winter. She admitted she dropped the matches on purpose as she has long waited to meet me, and then invited me up to meet her brother and friend. Her brother is a nice young fellow, about twenty years of age. His name is Victor, and he was a pilot in the Red air force. They gave me a cup of tea sweetened with saccharine. And I looked at Valentina, and know that she will be my wife.

   Food is very scarce in Riga and people are starving. The White Army is only forty miles away and times are very hard. The English and American governments send for to the city – rice, coca, sugar, flour, and milk. In nearly every street they have opened canteens, where food is cooked for the poor people. People queue up early in the morning, however cold it is, for the sake of getting a little hot meat. It is almost impossible to find a bread shop. If bread is sold it is sold very quietly, as if the Bolsheviks hear of it they come to the shop and take everything, paying in Kerensky money, which is worthless. I work at the cinema for eighty roubles as day. But forty of the roubles are paid to me in Kerensky money, which brings nothing. With the other forty roubles I can, if I am lucky, buy a pound of bread. The cinema is always full. The people do not know what to do with themselves in their hunger. They go there and sit from opening time to the end of the last performance, and you can’t even throw them out. A hungry audience, laughing at a hungry clown.

   Valentina asked me to lunch today. I accepted joyfully, sure that I would certainly get something to eat! We had potato peelings, washed and minced, mixed with a little pea flour and fried in castor-oil. For three days I have eaten very little, and it was delicious.

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

    

c. JUNE 1919

BACK AT HOME & I GET MARRIED.

   Things are growing worse. People now walk twenty or thirty miles out of Riga to try and find food. Sometimes the farmers give them some bread in exchange for clothes, gold and silver. I’ve had to exchange my overcoat for two pounds of bread!

The Bolsheviks have left Riga. The town is now occupied with Latvian and German soldiers.

And I have married Valentina at the Orthodox Church! Afterwards we went back to my mother-in-law’s house, and for our wedding feast we had on the table a pound of bread and one salt herring. We cut it in half and that was our wedding party.

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

c. JULY 1919

 

THE WAR IS NOT OVER FOR ME!

 NICOLAI POLIAKOFF: LATVIAN SOLDIER

    I have been ‘pressed’ into the Latvian army! ( This is the 6th Army I have been in since 1914!) I was walking home from the theatre and some soldiers stopped me and asked me my name and age. They ordered me to follow them to the barracks. I asked them to let me go home and tell my wife that I was in the army. But they would not let me go. Valentina came to the barracks yesterday and I was allowed to speak to her through the window. I told her to go home and not to worry. Now I am preparing to leave for the station after my name was read out in a list of names. I asked the sergeant if I might go and say goodbye to my wife, but he said it was quite impossible. I am very sad.

   Valentina has made me very happy! We had marched to the station with a band and people following us, crying and laughing, waving good-bye to brothers, husbands and fathers. I was about to climb into one the goods wagons waiting to transport us, when I heard a small, tearful voice. It was my wife. I ran to her and took her in my arms, and how she cried. I told her I am a soldier now and she must go home, also reminding her to think of my brother – I was going to fight the Reds! She told me if I didn’t take her with me she would throw herself under the train. ‘I mean it.’ Well, even by this point I know that if my wife says a thing she means it. Two soldiers reached out and each one took one of her hands and dragged her into the wagon as the train was starting to move off. I jumped in after her.

   The soldiers gave Valentina blankets and coats in case we came to a station and were inspected by an officer. At the first station a roll-call was made, but they did not find my wife. I started to sing in my happiness and the soldiers joined in. Sometimes we laughed because my wife looked so funny. When she left home she had not had time to dress. All she had on was a night-gown, slippers, overcoat, and round her neck an old-fashioned gold chain with a bunch of keys! The journey was very slow. At eleven o’clock at night we arrived at a station called Juan Gulbene. It was a three mile walk to the old castle where we are now. I went to one of the drivers and asked him to take my wife in the luggage cart, offering him pay. He’s a sour old man and he asked, ‘since when is it allowed to take one’s wife into the Latvian Army?’ But he accepted. It was cold and dark and very muddy. I did not mind so much. I was used to the army, but it was bad for the young lads only just joined. When we came at last to the castle, the carts were already there. I ran to my wife and helped her down. The driver promised to take her to the caretaker of a big house nearby. I will see her tomorrow. I lie in my bunk in what used to be a fine library and I cannot sleep, even after that long walk. I am sorry for myself, and sorry for my wife, and sad about everything.

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

c. NOV 1919

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF: LATVIAN SOLDIER

   Valentina and I have been allowed by the old major to look after the officers club. This morning, after roll-call, we had to go one by one into his office. After telling him my previous occupation and army record he named me as a corporal. I told him of my wife to his astonishment and after a lot of questions allowed me to go see her and report back in the afternoon. When I returned to him he granted us the officers club duty. My wife is looking to sell her gold chain to buy some new clothes. I have a new uniform and I wear my corporal’s stripes with pride.

   We have not stayed very long at the officers club as the work is too hard for Valentina. The responsibility of buying food for both of us has been way too much for me. So, Valentina has returned to Riga and I have been put to being an instructor.

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

c. JULY 1920

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF: LATVIAN SOLDIER

    15th July, 1920, Germany and Latvia have signed a ceasefire, so after two and a half years in the Latvian Army I heard that the War is over! I am so happy to be back to Riga!  

    I have joined the Circus Salamonski in Riga, and it is a happy company! Most of us have served in the War, and the gleaming lights, the smell of ring, and the sound of applause are a glorious relief and refreshment after bursting shells, the smell of death, and the whine of bullets. My hands have been used to handling rifles and bayonets. Now they are strangely clumsy when grasping sticks of makeup.

Narrative extracted from Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

ITALIAN TRANSLATION

 

COCO IL CLOWN

Tratto da “Coco The Clown” Autobiografia di Nicolai Poliakoff

1941, J.M. Dent & Sons Ltd.

 

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

NEWS DA UN ARTISTA BAMBINO.

Agosto 1914

Il mio amico Gingek è cambiato. Eccomi qui, lavoro felicemente senza alcun pensiero per la testa, aperto a tutte le gloriose possibilità che il circo ha in serbo per me dopo tutto quello che ho sofferto e lui cammina spavaldo sfoggiando la sua uniforme, con un sorriso soddisfatto lungo tutto il viso:” Spostati” mi dice “i soldati non parlano con i bambini. Obbedisci prima che ti infilzi con la mia baionetta.” Che amico!

Salta fuori che è iniziata una guerra tra Germania e Russia! Ogni pensiero sul mio futuro come clown famoso ha abbandonato la mia testa. Devo diventare un soldato, non sono un bambino! Ma c’è un problema. Nonostante la mia età non sia necessariamente un problema agli occhi dell’esercito, sono troppo basso. Però questo non mi scoraggia. Io sono un talentuoso artista circense!  Riesco a fare salti mortali, sono agile, sono forte, riesco a cavalcare un cavallo. Devono essere pazzi a voler rinunciare a qualcuno con le mie capacità, anche se inusuali.

Che frustrazione!  Sono disposto a rinunciare alla mia vita, rinunciare ai miei sogni di gloria nel circo e i miei ripetuti tentativi di arruolamento nel reggimento russo vengono declinati dalle risate!

 

Narrazione estratta dalla Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

Dicembre 1915

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

BAMBINO SOLDATO SIBERIANO

Finalmente, ora che sono quindicenne, sono stato accettato. Questa sensazione quasi eguaglia la gioia che ho provato la prima volta che mi sono esibito come artista pagato! Undicesimo Fanteria Siberiana, un reggimento composto da metà russi e metà Tartari. Tutti davvero bassi. Sono perfetto per questo ruolo! Anche se bassi di statura, i cuori sono grandi e ugualmente grande è la voglia di combattere. Grazie alla mia esperienza da fantino, sono stato nominato apripista e mi hanno dato un lungo cappotto, degli speroni e una sciabola che sferraglia contro la mia gamba. Mi sento un generale!

Ho appena visto Gingek e mi sono davvero goduto il momento! La sua mascella è caduta a terra e quasi balzò di meraviglia nel vedere la mia spada e gli speroni. “Fatti da parte” gli dissi:” Sono un apripista. Noi non parliamo con chi va a piedi!”

La guerra è persino più eccitante del circo! Ho già compiuto il mio primo trionfo militare! Siamo nei pressi di Oli, stavamo perlustrando la zona in attesa dell’arrivo del nostro battaglione quando ho notato uno strano pagliaio. Ho urlato “Alt!”, provocando una terribile agitazione nella truppa e molte imprecazioni da parte degli ufficiali. Dopo aver ispezionato questo sospetto mucchio di paglia abbiamo scoperto che nascondeva una mitragliatrice e molte munizioni. Il nemico si era preparato ad un’avanzata improvvisa, per coglierci di sorpresa! Ho brillato di orgoglio quando il vecchio generale ha appuntato una croce di Quarta classe alla mia tunica e promossomi Caporale. Sono così fiero e felice! La guerra è gloriosa e ricca di avventure!

 

Narrazione estratta dalla Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

1915

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

BAMBINO SOLDATO SIBERIANO

La guerra è offuscata da lacrime di dolore e orrore. Sono inginocchiato sul fondo di una trincea e piango malamente. Intorno a me la terra stessa si dissolve in fuoco e fumo. Queto è il vero volto della guerra. Il gioco è cambiato.

 

 

Narrazione estratta dalla Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

Dicembre 1916

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

BAMBINO SOLDATO SIBERIANO

Sono sdraiato in un letto di ospedale a Riga dopo essere stato ferito in un bombardamento aereo. Appena rimesso sarò rispedito subito al fronte. La paura mi sta consumando.

 

Narrazione estratta dalla Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

Febbraio 1917

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

BAMBINO SOLDATO SIBERIANO

Solo due mesi dopo le mie dimissioni dall’ ospedale di Riga sono di nuovo in un letto di ospedale, questa volta a Pietrogrado per un trattamento speciale dopo essere stato ferito al volto e ai piedi. Anche se traumatizzato dalle capacità che l’essere umano mi ha rivelato, sono lieto che il mio umorismo non sia cambiato e mi diverto a scherzare con gli altri pazienti del mio reparto. Non ci è permesso fumare qui e io bramo una sigaretta! Fortunatamente l’uomo nel letto vicino al mio me ne ha offerta una non appena l’infermiera è uscita dalla stanza. C’ era solo un piccolo problema: lui aveva ferite alle braccia per cui non poteva tirarmela, io non potevo camminare a causa dei miei piedi. La mia mente circense si risvegliò! Mi sono sporto dal mio letto è ho camminato fino al suo sulle mie mani con i miei piedi bendati che volteggiavano per aria! Non è tutto divertimento e giochi, anche se in reparto. Giaccio sveglio ogni notte, sapendo che i tedeschi sono sempre più vicini alla mia amata Russia. L’insonnia mi consuma. Li sento vagabondare inesorabilmente, i loro piedi che marciano. Mi rigiro con orrore. Nicolai il ragazzo è morto lentamente. Ora sono Nicolai l’uomo. Coco il Clown vive nel mio profondo.

 

Narrazione estratta dalla Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

RIVOLUZIONE! Verso Riga, luglio 1917

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

BAMBINO SOLDATO VERSO CASA

Il cibo è diventato davvero scarso e i pasti di qualità sono razionati per quelli disperatamente malati. Il capo ufficiale medico è appena arrivato in reparto e ha lanciato un appello a qualsiasi paziente abbastanza forte per camminare e di provvedere a sé stesso di lasciare l’ospedale. Sebbene mi senta ancora debole ho detto che sarei andato. Mi hanno dato dei vestiti che avrebbero fatto boati di risate in un pubblico al circo: un cappotto militare, una cintura da atleta e pantaloni civili. Non riesco a descrivere il cappello! Ed ora, in questi abiti grotteschi, camminerò le innevate vie di Pietrogrado.

Non conosco questa Pietrogrado. La città muore di fame. Ovunque i lavoratori sono in sciopero anche sotto minacce di 25 anni di esilio in Siberia o di fucilazione. I bambini si lamentano, le famiglie si stringono negli angoli delle mura domestiche cercando di tenere fuori il freddo mortale. La gente muore letteralmente di fame. Ovunque poliziotti armati fanno muovere poveri miserabili dalle strade. Piango per loro e per la Russia, lacrime di debolezza e tristezza.

Come le condizioni si fanno peggiori, la rivoluzione diventa più attraente. Ho appena provato ad attraversare il fiume Neva ma sono stato respinto da un poliziotto che mi ha detto che nessuno avrebbe potuto attraversare il ponte quella notte. Cosa dovrei fare? Vorrei tornare in ospedale, anche senza cibo. Un autocarro si fa avanti, pieno di studenti, soldati, marinai in congedo e alcune donne. Uno studente adi capelli lunghi si fa avanti e monta su una scatola, rivolgendosi alla folla in un linguaggio appassionato:” miei compagni!” piangeva, “la guerra è stata persa. Nelle vostre case si muore di fame! Non c’è speranza per voi! Rimarrete fermi a guardare i vostri mariti morire di fame, le vostre mogli morire di freddo, i vostri figli calpestati?” Tolse un panno rosso dal lato dell’autocarro, mostrando baionette, spade, pistole e munizioni. La folla impazzí! Grida e applausi provenivano da quelle povere e deboli gole! Mentre scrivo vedo qualcuno spingere una baionetta tra le mie mani e la vista di un’altra nella mia cintura da atleta mi fa sorridere.

Pietrogrado è un pandemonio! Un vecchio stanco, portando un catino contenente la cena, legato in un fazzoletto rosso, ha cercato di farsi strada attraverso la folla, cercando di attraversare il ponte sul fiume Neva. Un Cosacco lo ha fermato. Con una sottile, pietosa voce, il vecchio uomo ha spiegato che se fosse riuscito a raggiungere l’altra sponda del fiume sua figlia avrebbe potuto avere qualcosa da mangiare. Guardandolo tristemente, il cosacco ha declinato e se ne è andato. Il vecchio si è trascinato stancamente dopo di lui, ripetendo un vecchio proverbio russo che recita:” Un uomo che non ha fame non crederà mai a un uomo che ha fame”. Ciò ha infastidito l’ufficiale cosacco che ha ordinato a un soldato di portare via il vecchio. Ma il soldato non si è mosso. Imprecando, l’ufficiale ha raggiunto il vecchio e lo ha colpito furiosamente sul viso con il frustino. Il vecchio compagno perse il catino e iniziò a piangere. Senza proferire parola, il cosacco sguainò la sciabola e uccise l’ufficiale. I cosacchi uccisero tutti i loro ufficiali. La folla impazzì e tentò di passare il ponte. Ma da ogni tetto lungo le banchine arrivò una pioggia di proiettili, sparati dai poliziotti nascosti con le mitragliatrici, uccidendo molti. I corpi vennero gettati nel fiume. Un ululato. La folla appassionata attraversò il ponte e prese d’assalto gli edifici pubblici. La rivoluzione è cominciata. Questo non è il circo che fa per me. Devo arrivare a Riga a tutti i costi!

Mi sono ferito alla gamba con la mia stessa baionetta. Fisso un rosone rosso, fatto dagli abiti di uomini morti. Cercavo di farmi largo tra la folla a Zabolkanski Prospekt, quando ci fu uno scoppio di mitragliatrice dai tetti. Uomini e donne furono bersagliati e caddero tutt’intorno a me. Caddi e mi ferii con la baionetta. Stordito e spaventato, mi sono raccolto. Mentre stavo per passare un grande edificio, qualcuno gridò:” Attento!” Mi precipitai su un lato della strada quando un enorme armadio crollò da una finestra all’ ultimo piano. Un fracasso di schegge sul marciapiede, rotolarono fuori tre alti funzionari di polizia, morti. Un soldato a cavallo (sembrava così comico) si fece avanti e svuoto un caricatore sui cadaveri, per sicurezza. La folla, urlante e gridante, strappò la striscia rossa dai cappotti dei cadaveri. Una ragazza ride eccitata, premendo nella mia mano una delle strisce. L’ ho attaccata al mio cappotto. Ma non la voglio. Mi sono diretto velocemente verso la stazione. Un Clown del circo in una rivoluzione! C’è qualcosa di comico in questo. Ma ora come ora non sono in vena di comicità.

Anche salire sul treno è stata un’impresa. Tra la folla alla stazione, nel mio strano costume, la mia baionetta nella cintura e una rosetta rossa nel buco del bottone, credevo di sembrare abbastanza rivoluzionario per poter prendere un treno per Riga. Ore dopo, credo, arrivò un treno. Centinaia di uomini, donne e bambini si ammassarono sulla banchina. Alcune donne svennero. I bambini furono calpestati. Sentii solo terribili pianti e gemiti. Umanità e decenza sono state dimenticate in questo selvaggio esodo da una città impazzita. Fu quasi impossibile riuscire a prendere posto, così mi sono arrampicato sul tetto della carrozza. Ero incrostato di neve. Ma i passeggeri sotto di me erano così fitti e incastrati che il calore dei loro corpi è salito come colonne di fumo attraverso le ventole di aerazione. E questo vapore, per quanto nauseante, era l’unica cosa a mantenerci vivi mentre viaggiavamo nella lunga notte dell’inverno russo.

 

Narrazione estratta dalla Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

 

RIGA, agosto 1917

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

BAMBINO SOLDATO RUSSO

Alla fine ho raggiunto Riga! Quasi morto di freddo ed esausto, sono riuscito a tornare a casa. È così bello poter vedere di nuovo mio padre e mia madre, i miei fratelli e le mie sorelle. Ora come ora, dopo quello che ho passato non voglio più lasciare casa.

Anche mio fratello maggiore è tornato dalla guerra e prova molta rabbia contro i rivoluzionari. Mi ha detto che devo arruolarmi con lui nell ‘Armata Kerensky, che è nostro dovere. Nostra madre è sconvolta, si aggrappa a noi in lacrime, ma so che devo arruolarmi. Non sono propenso a vedere altre battaglie, contro nessuno, ma come dice mio fratello:” È nostro dovere!”.

Sono stato inserito nel First Petrograd Artistes Company. Lavoriamo tutto il giorno e viaggiamo di notte, da campo a campo, intrattenendo le truppe per mantenere alto il morale. I soldati sono ansiosi di essere smobilitati. Ho paura che la nostra compagnia venga sciolta.

 

Narrazione estratta dalla Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

 

Dicembre 1917

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

BAMBINO UKRAINO SOLDATO

Le mie paure sono diventate realtà e ora faccio parte dell’Armata bianca a Kiev. Condivido la stanza con un ferroviere, un riservato e misterioso compagno. Almeno ride ai miei scherzi.

 

Narrazione estratta dalla Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

BAMBINO DELL’ARMATA ROSSA

Il ferroviere si è rivelato un amico nel momento del bisogno. Mi sono arruolato in una compagnia differente: l’Armata Rossa delle Ferrovie di Kiev!

Un giorno l’Armata Rossa ha peso d’ assalto Kiev e cacciato l’Armata Bianca. Nella confusione sono rimasto indietro e mi sono ritrovato nelle mani di alcuni soldati Rossi. Sembra che pensassero fossi un agente del servizio segreto. Mi hanno chiesto un sacco di cose riguardanti l’Armata Bianca. Ho risposto che non sapevo nulla. Il calcio di un fucile si è schiantato sul mio volto. Mi hanno colpito fino a lasciarmi mezzo morto. “Ora ricordi qualcosa, eh, compagno? Meglio parlare e stare vivi, eh, compagno?”. Gli ho detto che non sapevo nulla, che ero soltanto un clown e che il mio compito era intrattenere le truppe. Il soldato sputò sul pavimento:” Bene, abbiamo un teatro per te”. Fui trascinato e spinto in un edificio. Ero al teatro di Kiev. Che vista stupefacente! La platea fu riempita di prigionieri: ufficiali, soldati, civili, sospetti aristocratici, mercanti nomadi, mendicanti, ammalati e feriti. Furono tutti radunati dalle truppe Rosse e messi a sedere nel teatro mentre attorno, in piedi, stavano le sentinelle. Un ufficiale Rosse apparì sul palco, un foglio tra le mani. Lesse una lista di nomi e i prigionieri furono trascinati dai loro sedili all’ esterno. Qualche minuto dopo sentimmo dei fucili fare fuoco. Era tutto. Vicino a me sedeva un ufficiale. Cercammo di alleggerire la tensione parlando. Gli parlai della mia vita da clown e dei concerti che tenevo per le truppe. L’ufficiale Rosso lesse un’altra lista di nomi, sentimmo le fucilate, riprendemmo il discorso. L’ufficiale salì nuovamente sul palco ma questa volta senza lista. Sperai che fossimo tutti rilasciati! Tutte le orecchie puntate sul palco. “Nicolai Poliakoff” gridò. Solo io. Il mio vicino mi strinse forte la mano. Camminai accompagnato da due guardie fino all’ anticamera. Fui messo a sedere di fronte a un tavolo. Dall’altra parte, vestito con una giacca di pelle stava il ferroviere, il mio compagni di stanza a Kiev! Il mio cuore sussultò. “Digli che non sono un soldato!”, ansimai “Non ho ucciso nessun compagno, sono un clown!”. Mi fece calmare e mi disse che sarei stato liberato. “libero di andare a casa?” chiesi, “oh, grazie! Grazie! Ne ho avuto abbastanza della guerra!”. Mi gemette il cuore quando mi disse che avrei fatto parte dell’Armata Rossa delle Ferrovie di Kiev. Ma era quello o la fucilazione.

 

Narrazione estratta dalla Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

APRILE 1918

BAMBINO SOLDATO DELL’ARMATA BIANCA

L’Armata Bianca è avanzata e ci sta cacciando da Kiev. Siamo arretrati fino a Ramadan, tra Kiev e Poltava. Il disastro ci segue ovunque andiamo. Questa volta è il Tifo.

Mi sono svegliato in uno strano letto, in uno strano posto. Mi fu ordinato di raggiungere Poltava e di farmi carico di alcune provviste. Durante la spedizione mi sentii sempre peggio. Realizzai con orrore che quelli erano i primi sintomi della febbre da tifo. Devo essere collassato improvvisamente nell’ oscurità. Un’infermiera mi avvisò che i Bianchi avevano occupato Poltava e che sarebbe stato meglio non dire niente fino a che non mi fossi sentito bene. Non sono sicuri di chi io sia. Farò come mi ha detto.

 

Narrazione estratta dalla Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

GIUGNO 1918

BAMBINO SOLDATO DELL’ARMATA BIANCA

Mi hanno nominato interprete tedesco ora che mi sono un po’ ristabilito. Ho finto di sentirmi ancora debole e incoerente, sono svenuto durante il tragitto per arrivare all’ ufficio dell’ufficiale tedesco che comandava questa sezione dell’Armata Bianca. Passammo delle guardie che stavano fustigando un uomo con delle bacchette. Le sue urla erano terribili, le guardie imprecavano e il sangue scorreva. Pensai che quello sarebbe stato il prossimo trattamento in serbo per me ma, con mia grande sorpresa, nessuno era restio nei miei confronti e quando seppero che potevo parlare un po’ in tedesco, mi ordinarono di far loro da interprete.

Dopo essere stato per qualche tempo a Poltava, oggi ho deciso di parlare con l’ufficiale in comando. Mi sentivo stanco e nostalgico. Pensai fosse rischioso tentare di chiedere per quanto tempo ancora sarei dovuto restare lì. Apparve sorpreso e mi chiese   se io fossi un prigioniero. “Penso di si Herr Kommandant. Ma sinceramente non lo so”. Disse che avrebbe preso in considerazione la mia domanda, il che mi da speranza.

Anche oggi fui mandato da Herr Kommandant, il quale mi disse che nessuno sembra sapere nulla di me! “Se vuoi andartene, vattene ora”. Lo salutai. Per la prima volta nella mia vita sono felice che nessuno si interessi se io viva o muoia, rimanga o parta!

Mosca è malinconica e disorganizzata, colpita dalla carestia. Dopo qualche mese di fatica, sono riuscito ad arrivare in città per trovare patate e aringhe, che valgono più oro di quanto pesino. Gente affamata, che rischia di prendersi un proiettile dalle guardie, scava nei bidoni della spazzatura, in cerca di cibo ormai scaduto. L’orrenda scena di crudeltà, rabbia e avidità rimarrà impressa in me fino alla mia morte.

Oggi non ho potuto credere alle mie orecchie! Stavo vagando per le strade e qualcuno mi chiamò: la voce di mio padre! Un ghiacciante stupore mi fece rimanere ritto, poi mi voltai cautamente. Era mio padre, che io credevo salvo a Riga. Ha perso peso e indossa stracci per vestiti. Mi sorrise malinconico. Ci fu appena il tempo per lui di spiegare la strana, tempestosa storia di cosa lo abbia portato a Mosca prima che realizzassimo che entrambi dovevamo mangiare qualcosa. Ci siamo avviati verso la campagna, per compare del pane e portarlo in città per rivenderlo a fare qualche soldo! Dopo qualche tempo siamo stati in grado di viaggiare verso Vitebsk.

 

Narrazione estratta dalla Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

 

 

NOVEMBRE 1918

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

BAMBINO SOLDATO DELL’ARMATA BIANCA

A Vitesbk ho incontrato per caso un vecchio clown di un circo italiano di nome Bernardo. Suo figlio lo ha abbandonato e ora è da solo. Ho pensato che ci saremmo potuti tenere fuori dai guai ed evitato combattimenti se ci unissimo e facessimo il lavoro che facevo nell’esercito Kerenske: risollevare il morale alle truppe. Ci è voluto un po’ ma alla fine ho convinto Bernardo ad accompagnarmi al quartier generale dell’Armata Rossa dove hanno approvato il mio piano! Ci sarà data una piccola percentuale dei soldi presi per ogni performance che organizziamo. Non abbiamo ancora ricevuto il ostro primo ordine e con i pochi soldi che ci restano ho detto a mio padre di tornare a casa a Riga. Inizialmente riluttante ma poi convinto, ha preso i soldi e i numerosi messaggi da dare a mia madre e ai miei fratelli e sorelle.

Dire che se non usciamo da questo infermo ghiacciato moriremo entrambi è dir poco. Il nostro primo ordine ricevuto dall’Armata Rossa è stato di andare in servizio attivo, in Siberia! Le condizioni sono terribili. Io ho portato il povero vecchio Bernardo in questa situazione e le sue condizioni mi preoccupano terribilmente. Per ogni miglio del nostro orribile viaggio ha pensato a un nuovo nome per me. Una volta lavorati tutti quelli che poteva in italiano, ha ricominciato da capo in russo.

 

 Narrazione estratta dalla Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

DICEMRE 1918

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

TORNA A CASA

Non ci sono né luci né risate in casa mia. Sono tornato a Riga. Anche Bernardo è stato mandato a casa, prima di me (un’altra casualità). Mentre ero a Pietrogrado un gruppo di Rossi ha fatto irruzione in casa nostra. Mio fratello maggiore era lì, pranzava con i miei genitori. I Rossi lo conoscevano come ex-soldato dell’Armata Bianca. Lo hanno trascinato fuori, nel giardino dietro casa. La mia povera madre urlava e implorava, in vano. Gli hanno sparato e lo hanno lasciato sanguinare fino alla morte, nella neve. Sento l’odio senza senso che brucia al cuore di questa rivoluzione e giuro vendetta contro tutti i Rossi.

Ho deciso di stare a casa con i miei genitori per un po’. Stanno invecchiando e si sentono tristi e soli dopo la morte crudele di mio fratello. Sono riuscito a trovare lavoro, sul palco, al cinema in città. Ogni notte, sulla strada per tornare a casa, passo un blocco di appartamenti. La notte scorsa, passando gli appartamenti, qualcosa è caduto sull’asfalto in fronte a me. Era una scatola di fiammiferi. Li ho raccolti e ho guardato in su, all’ edificio. Due ragazze e un giovane uomo stavano guardando giù da una finestra del sesto piano, ridendo. Ho chiamato e chiesto se i fiammiferi appartenessero a loro. Una ragazza è scesa e guardandola ho pensato che fosse la ragazza più amabile che avessi ami visto. Ci siamo scambiati un sorriso. Il suo nome era Valentina. Mi ha detto di avermi riconosciuto sul palcoscenico e io le ho risposto che non dovrebbe tenere le finestre aperte d’inverno. Ha ammesso di aver fattp cadere i fiammiferi di proposito, solo per incontrarmi. Mi ha invitato a salire a casa sua per conoscere suo fratello e una sua amica. Il fratello è un giovane compagno sulla ventina. Si chiama Victor, faceva il pilota nelle forze aeree dell’Armata Rossa. Mi hanno offerto una tazza di the addolcita con la saccarina. Ho guardato Valentina e ho saputo fin da subito che sarebbe diventata mia moglie.

Il cibo scarseggia a Riga e la popolazione è affamata. L’Armata Bianca è a sole 40 miglia di distanza e i tempi sono molto duri. I governi inglese e americano inviano per la città: riso, cacao, zucchero, farina e latte. In quasi tutte le strade sono state aperte delle mense, dove il cibo viene cucinato per la povera gente. Le code di persone iniziano la mattina presto, nonostante il freddo, per assicurarsi un pasto caldo. È quasi impossibile trovare un negozio che venda pane.  Se il pane viene venduto, lo si fa cautamente, perché se i Bolscevichi vengono a sapere che c’è pane, arrivano e prendono tutto, pagando in moneta Kerenske che non vale nulla. Io lavoro al cinema per 80 rubli al giorno, 40 dei quali mi vengono pagati in moneta Kerenske. Con i restanti 40 posso, se sono fortunato, comprare mezzo chilo di pane. Il cinema è sempre pieno. Le persone non sanno cosa fare di sé stesse nella fame. Quindi vanno al cinema, si siedono dall’apertura e vi rimangono fino all’ultima performance. Non puoi nemmeno buttarli fuori. Un pubblico affamato, che ride di un clown affamato.

Valentina mi ha chiesto di pranzare insieme oggi. Ho accettato con gioia, sicuro che avrei certamente mangiato qualcosa! Abbiamo mangiato bucce di patate, lavate e tritate, condite con farina di piselli e fritte in olio di ricino. Per 3 giorni ho mangiato davvero poco e questo pranzo è stato delizioso!

 

Narrazione estratta dalla Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

GIUGNO 1919

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

TORNA A CASA

Le cose stanno peggiorando. Le persone cammina anche 30 miglia al giorno per cercare cibo. Qualche volta i fattori barattano pane per vestiti, oro e argento. Io ho scambiato la mia giacca per un chilo di pane.

I Bolscevichi hanno lasciato Riga. La città è ora occupata da tedeschi e latvaniani.

Io ho sposato Valentina nella chiesa ortodossa! Siamo andati poi a casa da mia suocera e come pranzo di nozze, abbiamo avuto sul tavolo mezzo chilo di pane e un’aringa salata. L’abbiamo tagliata a metà e condivisa.

 

Narrazione estratta dalla Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

LUGLIO 1919

NICOLAI POLIAKOFF

SOLDATO LATVANIANO

Sono stato “spinto” nell’Armata Latvaniana (questo è il sesto esercito in cui mi arruolo dal 1914)! Stavo camminando verso casa dal teatro quando alcuni soldati mi hanno fermato. Hanno chiesto il mio nome e la mia età. Mi hanno poi ordinato di seguirli fino alla caserma. Ho chiesto loro di lasciarmi andare a casa per avvertire mia moglie che mi ero arruolato. Ma non mi hanno lasciato. Valentina è venuta in caserma ieri e mi è stato permesso di parlarle tramite una finestra. Le ho detto di andare a casa e di non preoccuparsi. Ora mi sto preparando per andare alla stazione dopo che il mio nome è stato letto da una lista. Ho chiesto al Sergente di poter andare a salutare mia moglie. Mi ha risposto che era impossibile. Sono molto triste.

Valentina mi ha fatto davvero felice! Abbiamo marciato fino alla stazione, seguiti da una banda e da molte persone che piangevano e ridevano, salutando fratelli, mariti e padri. Stavo per salire su uno dei vagoni che aspettava di trasportarci quando ho sentito una sottile e lacrimante voce. Era mia moglie. Sono corso verso di lei e l’ho presa tra le mie braccia. Come piangeva! Le ho detto che ora sono un soldato e che lei doveva andare a casa e badare ai miei fratelli in mia assenza. Stavo andando a combattere i Rossi! Mi ha detto che se non l’avessi portata con me si sarebbe buttata sotto al treno. “Lo faccio!”. A questo punto anche io so che se mia moglie dice una cosa, è sicuro che la farà. 2 soldati la hanno presa per mano e issata sul vagone che stava iniziando a muoversi. Io sono salito subito dopo di lei.

I soldati le hanno dato coperte e giubbotti, in caso arrivassimo a una stazione di controllo e fossimo ispezionati da un ufficiale. Alla prima stazione fu fatto un appello, ma non hanno trovato mia moglie. Ho cominciato a cantare nel mio stato di felicità e gli altri soldati si sono aggregati. Qualche volta abbiamo riso perché mia moglie sembrava davvero buffa. Quando è uscita di casa non ha avuto tempo di vestirsi. Tutto ciò che aveva era una camicia da notte, un cappotto e, attorno al collo, una vecchia catenina d’oro con attaccato un mazzo di chiavi! Il viaggio è stato molto lento. Alle 11 di sera siamo arrivati alla stazione di Juan Gulbene, che si trova a 3 miglia dal vecchio castello in cui siamo ora. Sono andato da uno degli autisti e gli ho chiesto di portare mia moglie nel carrello porta bagagli, in cambio di qualche soldo. È un vecchio e acido uomo che mi ha chiesto:” da quando uno si porta la moglie nell’esercito?” ma ha comunque accettato. Faceva freddo, era buio e il terreno era fangoso. Non mi dispiaceva poi così tanto. Sono abituato all’esercito, ma non lo sono i giovani ragazzi appena arruolati. Quando alla fine siamo arrivati al castello, il carrello era già lì. Sono corso da mia moglie per aiutarla a ascendere. L’autista mi ha promesso di portarla al sicuro dal guardiano di una vecchia grande casa qui vicino. La rivedrò domani. Sono sdraiato nella mia cuccetta, quella che sembra essere stata una raffinata libreria e non riesco a dormire, nonostante quella lunga camminata. Mi dispiace per me, per mia moglie e sono triste per tutto ciò che sta succedendo.

 

Narrazione estratta dalla Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

NOVEMBRE 1919

Valentina ed io siamo stati assegnati dal vecchio maggiore a prenderci cura del club degli ufficiali. Questa mattina, dopo l’appello, siamo entrati uno alla volta nel suo ufficio. Dopo avergli detto della mia precedente occupazione e dei miei trascorsi nell’esercito mi ha nominato Caporale. Gli ho detto di mia moglie e dopo aver digerito lo stupore e dopo una lunga serie di domande, mi ha permesso di farle visita e di fare rapporto ogni pomeriggio. Quando sono tornato da lui ci ha assegnato la mansione del club degli ufficiali. Mia moglie sta cercando di vendere la sua collana per comprarsi qualche nuovo vestito. Io ho una nuova uniforme e vesto le mie strisce da Caporale con molto orgoglio.

Non siamo rimasti molto al club degli ufficiali in quanto il lavoro per Valentina era troppo duro. La responsabilità di comprare cibo per entrambi è diventata troppa per me. Quindi, Valentina è tornata a Riga e io sono stato nominato istruttore.

 

LUGLIO 1920

15 luglio 1920. Germania e Latvia hanno firmato un cessate il fuoco, quindi dopo due anni e mezzo nell’Armata Latvaniana ho finalmente sentito la notizia della fine della Guerra! Sono così felice di poter tornare a Riga! Mi sono unito al Circo Salamonski di Riga, un’allegra compagnia! Molti di noi hanno servito durante la Guerra e le luci scintillanti, l’odore dell’arena e il suono degli applausi sono un glorioso e rinfrescante sollievo dopo il suono di bombe esplose, la puzza di morte e il sibilo dei proiettili, le mie mani sono state usate per imbracciare fucili e baionette. Ora sono stranamente maldestro nel tenere i bastoncini da trucco.

 

Narrazione estratta dalla Bibliog. Ref: Coco

 

 

 

 

«
»